Author Topic: CC/IMPACTS  (Read 9 times)

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CC/IMPACTS
« on: January 24, 2017, 07:59:23 am »
DECAY RATE INCREASE WITH TEMP INCREASE
Light Curves, by Charles Chandler
http://qdl.scs-inc.us/?top=18943
[Scientists] neglect differences in the radioactive decay rates depending on temperature.10,11 ... (I)t's more likely that the crust cooled slowly, and thus the radioactive decay rate would have run faster, thereby falsely reporting a greater age.
11. Emery, G. T., Perturbation of Nuclear Decay Rates, 1972/12, Annual Review of Nuclear Science, Vol 22, pp165-202
http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.ns.22.120172.001121
10. Sur le rayonnement du radium à la température de l'hydrogène liquide, 1913/06,
http://radium.journaldephysique.org/articles/radium/pdf/1913/06/radium_1913__10_6_181_0.pdf
Curie, P.; Onnes, M. K., MASSON ET CIE, Editeurs, Journal de Physique: Le Radium, Vol 10, Issue 6, pp 181-186
http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/radium:01913001006018100

Causes of Planetary Cratering and Scarring
http://qdl.scs-inc.us/?top=10962
Impact Craters by Thermonuclear Explosion
http://thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=7315&start=120#p76229
Postby CharlesChandler» Tue Jan 15, 2013 6:10am
.LK: Other TPODs propose that most impact craters are formed from similar megalightning, rather than from bolide impacts.
- Do you think the craters are likely formed by lightning or bolide impacts?
.CC: I think that all of the perfectly circular craters are formed by thermonuclear explosions.
- The instantaneous temperatures and pressures in the impact of a rock even only a couple of meters across, but traveling at 70 km/s, will be sufficient for nuclear fusion.
- The craters are circular, instead of oblong, because they were caused by the relativistic ejecta from the fusion event, not the trajectory of the impacter.
- And there is nothing to be found of the meteor because it was all reduced to plasma by the explosion.

Thermonuclear Explosions from Impacts
http://thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=7315&start=120#p76424
LK: Thermonuclear Explosions from Impacts: If cratering is pretty easy to explain by your theory, could you provide the main details of the crater forming process for us? - How does high velocity impact produce thermonuclear explosion?
.CC: It isn't such a fancy hypothesis, actually.
- The simple facts are that nuclear fusion requires extreme temperatures (to get particle collisions that break up the existing nuclei) and extreme pressures (to keep the pieces from going anywhere until they get a chance to clank back together into larger nuclei).
- In an impact, the momentum is thermalized, so there's the heat source.
- And until all of the momentum is thermalized, the remaining inertial force provides the pressure.
- And there is no theoretical limit to the amount of energy that can be stored in momentum.
- The velocity "might" be limited to the speed of light, but there is no limit on the amount of mass involved.
- So at least hypothetically, it's an easy reach to conclude that an impact would create the necessary temperatures and pressures for fusion.
- A physicist would be able to tell you exactly how much mass, of what element, moving at what speed, would be required to get how much fusion.
- I'm satisfied that it's a hypothetical possibility, and that its properties match the observations.

Call for Criticisms on New Solar Model
http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=76043&sid=7c697f77e579170b905d85d094b5d5c6#p76424
Postby CharlesChandler» Fri Jan 18, 2013 2:38am
.Q: How does high velocity impact produce thermonuclear explosion?
.CC: Nuclear fusion requires extreme temperatures (to get particle collisions that break up the existing nuclei) and extreme pressures (to keep the pieces from going anywhere until they get a chance to clank back together into larger nuclei).
- In an impact, the momentum is thermalized, so there's the heat source.
- And until all of the momentum is thermalized, the remaining inertial force provides the pressure.
- And there is no theoretical limit to the amount of energy that can be stored in momentum.
- The velocity "might" be limited to the speed of light, but there is no limit on the amount of mass involved.
- So at least hypothetically, it's an easy reach to conclude that an impact would create the necessary temperatures and pressures for fusion.
- I'm satisfied that it's a hypothetical possibility, and that its properties match the observations.

FUSION & GAMMA RAYS
http://qdl.scs-inc.us/?top=5738
the combined speed between opposing charge streams in the toroidal plasmoid will be double that — 1.72 c! At that rate, the magnetic pinch will be extremely robust, and the ohmic heating will create extreme temperatures — easily the conditions necessary for nuclear fusion. - This is interesting because one of the telltale signs of nuclear fusion in the laboratory is the release of gamma rays, and we certainly observe such radiation during the formation of certain types of stars. But in the standard model, such observations shouldn't be possible in space. Gamma rays are absorbed by the thinnest of gas clouds.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2017, 01:58:07 pm by Admin »

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